Webinar 3: Using Technology to Support Victims During a Public Health Crisis on April 8

Webinar 3: Using Technology to Support Victims During a Public Health Crisis on April 8

The third webinar in our series of weekly events during the coronavirus outbreak will be on Wednesday, April 8 at 9am ET Washington, DC (9pm in Taiwan) on the topic of “Using Technology to Support Victims During a Public Health Crisis”

Register Here

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Global Network of Women’s Shelters (GNWS) will be hosting weekly webinars to share lessons learned and best practices from around the globe. Weekly webinars will be scheduled at different times to accommodate different time zones.

The COVID-19 outbreak has presented multiple challenges for organizations working with victims of gender-based violence, including ensuring the safety of staff and victims, supporting victims using digital services, helping staff work remotely, and providing adequate resources in shelter.

In addition, as families are being told to stay at home, women and children who are vulnerable to domestic abuse will be at greater risk. Survivors of sexual and domestic violence need support, even while many communities are using physical distancing to reduce the spread of the virus.

In this webinar, the US The National Network to End Domestic Violence, Women’s Services Network – WESNET Australia, and safetyNed from the Netherlands will share strategies for using technology to support victims during a public health crisis. Topics of discussion will include:

  • Digital platforms to continue providing services,
  • Translating advocacy skills into digital services,
  • Protecting victim confidentiality, and
  • Security for digital services.

We will also leave time for updates from shelter organizations & SV NGOs around the world and questions from the webinar participants.

THIS WEBINAR WILL BE RECORDED AND SHARED AFTERWARD

Report on Coronavirus Webinar 2: Policy perspectives on protection of victims of domestic violence

The second webinar in series of weekly events organized by the Global Network of Women’s Shelters took place today. Speakers covered issues of prevention measures and government policy in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Speakers

Dr. Twu Shiing-jer was Minister for Health and Welfare in Taiwan during the SARS crisis. The lessons learned from the outbreak in 2003 have been credited for helping Taiwan keep COVID-19 under control. Dr. Twu has also served as a legislator and the mayor of Chiayi City.

Chen I-ju is a Section Chief in the Department of Protective Services under the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Ms. Chen’s department handles domestic violence prevention services, the national domestic abuse hotline, and other programs including women’s shelters.

Shelter representatives:

  • Chisato Kitanaka, Japan, Asia Network of Women’s Shelters
  • Diana Vàzquez, Ecuador, Interamerican Network of shelters (RiRE)
  • Van Anh Nguyen, Vietnam
  • Maria Munir, Ethiopia
  • Pille Tsopp-Pagan,  Estonia/WAVE
  • Cindy Southworth, National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV), USA
  • Chi Hui-Jung, Global Network of Women’s Shelters (GNWS)

The webinar addressed the following questions:

  1. In lockdown situations, how can shelters and domestic violence prevention organizations respond?
  2. What should governments do to address the needs of survivors of violence?
  3. What procedures should shelters follow to treat residents who show symptoms of COVID-19?
  4. What policies should governments implement to help shelters respond to coronavirus?
  5. How can shelters protect the confidentiality of survivors and avoid screening that denies access to services, while at the same time also protect the health of other residents and staff from COVID-19?
  6. What lessons did Taiwan learn from SARS that helped prepare for coronavirus?

Presentation Materials

  • Presentation on COVID-19 by former Taiwanese Health Minister Dr. Twu Shiing-jer
  • Remarks by Chen I-ju, Protective Services Department, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taiwan
    • What are the government’s policies regarding COVID-19 response measures to be taken by shelters?
      Regarding measures taken at women’s shelters, we follow the Guidelines for Severe Pneumonia with Novel Pathogens (COVID-19) Infection Control at Long-term Care Facilities adopted by the Taiwanese government (outlined in last week’s webinar). The measures include infection prevention education and training, advocating proper hygiene, health management of employees and shelter residents, management of visitors, reporting and management of infected persons, a list of precautions for those at risk of infection, and standardized protection measures.The safety of those conducting at-home quarantine and isolation must be evaluated. If an individual is found to be in need of shelter services, we will provide the individual with an isolated room for one based on the Guidelines for Severe Pneumonia with Novel Pathogens (COVID-19) Infection Control at Accommodation-type Long-term Care Facilities, thus ensuring both safety and infection control.
    • If a lockdown takes place, how can domestic violence be prevented? What measures will the government take?
      To prevent domestic violence from increasing in frequency or severity during at-home isolation or quarantine, the following measures have been adopted:We will continually monitor the number of reports of domestic violence throughout Taiwan, especially in regions with greater numbers of people in at-home isolation or quarantine, and compare these numbers to those of years past to see whether the number of reports is abnormally increasing or decreasing. If there is an abnormal change, we will respond as quickly as possible while continuing to supervise the related visits and investigations conducted by local government agencies in the handling of such cases to ensure established procedure is being followed and to provide protection services when needed.During the outbreak, 24 hours a day, those in need may obtain aid by calling the Protection Hotline at 113 or the police at 110, or they may make reports on the online platform ecare.mohw.gov.tw. The 113 Protection Hotline provides not only phone consultation but also online and messaging consultation. This means that there are other options when an individual who is in at-home isolation or quarantine suffers from domestic violence but is unable to call 113 or 110.

      We will continue to promote the Zero Tolerance for Violence Community Plan to enhance people’s consciousness of domestic violence in their communities and encourage them to take the initiative in providing assistance or reporting incidents. We are also encouraging cooperation between local governments, organizations, neighborhood/borough heads, and borough administrative staff, especially regarding those in at-home isolation or quarantine, to be acutely aware of what is happening. In accordance with the law, they are to report any suspicion of domestic violence that may be aroused while they are providing services to families.

Other resources

Be sure to join next week’s webinar on Using Technology to Support Victims During the Coronavirus Crisis.

GNWS Webinar #2 – Coronavirus and Women’s Shelters: Policy perspectives on protection of victims of domestic violence during the outbreak

GNWS Webinar #2 – Coronavirus and Women’s Shelters: Policy perspectives on protection of victims of domestic violence during the outbreak

On Wednesday, April 1 at 6AM EST (6PM Taiwan time), the Garden of Hope Foundation, the Asian Network of Women’s Shelters (ANWS) and the Global Network of Women’s Shelters (GNWS) will hold their second webinar on the topic of “Coronavirus and Women’s Shelters: Policy perspectives on protection of victims of domestic violence during the outbreak”.

We are fortunate to have secured two highly experienced officials from the Taiwanese government, who have kindly agreed to take time out of their busy schedules to give presentations and answer questions.

Dr. Twu Shiing-jer was Minister for Health and Welfare in Taiwan during the SARS crisis. The lessons learned from the outbreak in 2003 have been credited for helping Taiwan keep COVID-19 under control. Dr. Twu has also served as a legislator and the mayor of Chiayi City.

Chen I-ju is a Section Chief in the Department of Protective Services under the Ministry of Health and Welfare. Ms. Chen’s department handles domestic violence prevention services, the national domestic abuse hotline, and other programs including women’s shelters.

We will also leave plenty of time for updates from shelter organizations around the world and questions from the webinar participants.

The webinar will address the following questions:

  1. In lockdown situations, how can shelters and domestic violence prevention organizations respond? What should governments do to address the needs of survivors of violence?
  2. What procedures should shelters follow to treat residents who show symptoms of COVID-19?
  3. What policies should governments implement to help shelters respond to coronavirus?
  4. How can shelters protect the confidentiality of survivors and avoid screening that denies access to services, while at the same time also protect the health of other residents and staff from COVID-19?
  5. What lessons did Taiwan learn from SARS that helped prepare for coronavirus?

Register here.

 

Video and Q&A from the “Coronavirus and women’s shelters: Planning, preparation and response to the COVID-19 pandemic” webinar

The Global Network of Women’s Shelters (GNWS) and Asian Network of Women’s Shelters jointly organized a webinar on “Coronavirus and women’s shelters: Planning, preparation and response to the COVID-19 pandemic” on Wednesday, March 25, 2020. 8-9:30PM Taiwan time. 

Seven hundred people from all over the world registered for the webinar. The following is the video of the event and answers to some of the questions posted online by participants. We are planning to hold another webinar at 6PM Taiwan time on Wednesday April 1.

Q&A

  • What happened to the financial resources of the shelters? Did they completely stopped or the government took part?
    In Taiwan the government has continued to support shelters as normal, and helped supply them with free thermometers, masks and alcohol sanitizer. Other equipment such as gloves, protective clothing, visors etc must be purchased by the shelters.
  • Does the shelters with their own resources took care of the costs of caring for those who are infected?
    Officially the government should do that, but in practice there are some gaps in what they give.
  • How did you manage the behaviour challenges, anxiety, acting out?
    GOH has counselors and spiritual counselors who visit the shelters to provide support and prayer for the residents.
  • What kind of support/collaboration did you need from your government?
    The government needs to help prepare quarantine facilities for confirmed cases, and alternative accommodation if the shelter has to be evacuated.
  • Are you reusing masks? Or did everyone get fresh masks daily?
    In the shelters the government provides free masks. For the public, the government is rationing masks, everyone can buy 3 a week. Most people are reusing masks for 2-3 days before disposing them.
  • What type of masks are provided and what training?
    Medical masks, not N95 respirators, but good enough for general use. Training is the same as WHO recommendations – use with good hand hygiene, don’t touch the front of the mask, etc.
  • In Alberta we are being told to only use masks on those who are infected or suspected of infection.
    Taiwan is producing 13 million masks a day, but even then the government is still rationing them to the public. In countries where there is a shortage of masks, we can understand why the authorities are channeling them to health workers and suspected cases only.
  • How many times per day do you apply sanitation measures?
    It is done in the morning, lunchtime, and afternoon/evening. Surfaces that everyone touches, including handles, switches, tables, computer keyboards, etc are sterilized with alcohol spray. Floors in the clients’ rooms are done with bleach in the morning and evening.
  • Was this structure for response already in place before?
    Yes, since the SARS crisis these protocols have been ready. Every winter the government also provides free influenza vaccines to shelters, and N95 masks for children who develop a fever.
  • Are there any contingency plans if you end up with a lot of survivors? The distancing may be difficult if the shelters are at full capacity or even more.
    We are making plans for two possible scenarios – either move everyone to a separate care center for quarantine, or if there is enough space keep everyone in the shelter in separate spaces.
  • What are the testing policies in place. Universal testing, weekly testing, testing after symptoms, testing only of those in vulnerable populations?
    In Taiwan there is testing for (1) suspected cases, (2) people who have been in contact with confirmed cases, (3) anyone coming in from overseas.
  • Is food served with disposable utensils?
    Some shelters are using disposable plates etc, others give residents their own utensils which they wash themselves.
  • What can we do if we are receiving push back from funders on protocol? For example, we are being told that we are violating residents’ rights by taking clients temperatures and that if we quarantine clients on one certain level of the shelter this could be discrimination that is an issue we are facing. Please send us the info and we can help raise awareness on our social media sites and other networks.
  • In USA we are not allowed to ask clients these questions because of VAWA rules. So how do we really stay safe?
    So far this hasn’t been an issue in Taiwan. We would need to defer to our colleagues in North America for advice on client confidentiality regulations.
  • Hello from Ontario, Canada. We are not on official lockdown yet. Most people are practicing self-quarantine. Because we are not on lockdown, we are reluctant to enforce that women stay in shelter. How would you recommend we move forward? Is it ethical to enforce self-quarantine on women in shelter for the safety of all there?
    See above.
  • Hello from Slovakia, I have a question about child custody and visitation rights: if and how do your governments or courts deal with the question of visitation rights of abusive men who have court decisions defining their visitation rights and insist on seeing their children and/or taking them to their households for the weekend or longer period of time in case of joint custody? Are there any regulations on that in any of the participating countries?
    There isn’t a lockdown in Taiwan at the moment so we haven’t had to face issues of rights and ethics yet.
  • In Mongolia we have very few cases and no community transmission yet, so now is truly the time for preparation. What are some things you wish you did before outbreaks? Hopefully, we can learn from your experience and prepare well. Thanks.
    Prepare supplies and resources, including food, train your staff, residents and children, teach and practice social distancing. The most important thing is sanitizer hand wash and masks.
  • What’s the possibility of having more domestic violence and how to handle it?
    This is a real possibility. Employers need to check up on staff working at home to make sure they are safe. The social welfare system also needs to deliver heightened protection services.
    Comment from a participant: In Lazio and Campania we are experiencing a dramatic decrease in phone calls and access of women subjected to SGBV, 80% less than usual. We activated all possible alternatives to phone calls, and promoted them online, to allow women to contact us through emails, SMS, WhatsApp, Messenger and even social media as Telegram and Tictoc. As for migrant women, survivors of SGBV, including human trafficking, we are sending messages and videos in different languages to provide information on the lockdown measures and the possibility to ask for help. We agree that this is the moment to push for authorities to apply the laws on protection measures for women, believing survivors and forcing men to leave houses.
  • I have a question about local communities with high underserved populations, e.g., rural, indigenous. Have your shelters accepted new clients and if so, how can underserved communities access the shelter, e.g., transportation to shelter, acute trauma medical needs, separation from abuser if necessary, etc., when under a government-ordered lockdown?
    So far thankfully we haven’t faced this situation in Taiwan yet.
    Comment from participant: In the midst of the crisis, people with oriental features belonging to north east part of India are forced to flee and look for alternate shelters. They are suspected to be carriers of the virus and hence asked to vacate rented places. Housing / rights to reside are being violated. Government, police are being strict with such perpetrators of such abuse. Racism, discrimination and abuse are off shoots of the pandemic which will require long term support.
  • Do you recommend moving to a model where essential staff live in shelter?
    No. We wouldn’t recommend that unless the staff were quarantined with the residents.
  • Have domestic violence shelters made any changes in their policies with rape crisis centers?
    So far no.
  • Are you providing food for the women who are being housed outside of the shelter?
    Not at the moment, no.
  • Would he be possible to email a script of this after?
    Yes, we will send out an email with the recording and transcript
  • How do counsellors reach out with psycho social care to women in distress?
    Social workers and counselors have cut down or stopped home visits and transferred to using video conferencing or telephone calls.
  • What are you doing to prevent the crisis and spread and to support clients with programming in the shelter?
    At the moment, education, hygiene, distancing, health checks, communicating online etc.
  • Is it better to medically examine women survivors of violence before we can provide shelter services for them, or is it better to ask that they have an isolated rooms until the health is confirmed?
    In Taiwan we are following the protocol of temperature check and TOCC questions before entering the shelter, then get a test if they are suspected, and either send them for medical treatment or isolate in the shelter. Please see the presentation slides for details.
  • Some children from children shelters went home only the orphans are left with us. So what measures could be taken when they come back?
    In Taiwan shelters would follow the same protocol as above.
  • We only have one medium/long term shelter in Solomon Islands. If there is a confirmed case in shelter, does the entire shelter need to close while everyone is quarantined for 14 days? And how then would we ensure service continuity?
    If the shelter has the space to allow residents and staff to stay safely apart then it can become a quarantine center, if not, then we suggest contingency plans for alternative accommodation such as a hotel.

Presentation slides and other documents:

Other resources

Speakers:

  • Ni Hsin, Mustard Seed Mission (MSM), Taiwan
  • Anthony Carlisle, The Garden of Hope Foundation (GOH), Taiwan
  • Chi Hui-Jung, Global Network of Women’s Shelters
  • Cindy Southworth & Erica Olsen, National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV), USA
  • Marcella Pirrone, D.i.Re, Italy
  • Margaret Augerinos, Center for Non-Violence, Australia
  • Fatima Outaleb, UAF Shelter, Morocco
  • Margarita Guille, Red Interamericana de Refugios, Mexico
  • Maria Munir, AWSAD, Ethiopia

Many thanks to NNEDV for hosting this event.

WEBINAR – Coronavirus and women’s shelters: Planning, preparation and response to the COVID-19 pandemic

The Global Network of Women’s Shelters (GNWS) and ANWS are jointly organizing a webinar on “Coronavirus and women’s shelters: Planning, preparation and response to the COVID-19 pandemic” on Wednesday, March 25, 2020. 8:00PM-9:30PM Taiwan time (08:00AM-9:30AM Eastern Time US & Canada)

The rapid spread of coronavirus/COVID-19 has created an unprecedented humanitarian crisis around the world. As with most disasters, women and girls are likely to be disproportionately affected.

The outbreak presents huge challenges for shelters in terms of safety and training for staff, protection of clients, measures to contain an outbreak within a facility, helping staff work remotely while still supporting victims, and ensuring adequate resources are in place. In addition, as families are encouraged or forced to stay at home, women and children who are vulnerable to domestic abuse will be at greater risk.

In this webinar, we will invite shelter organizations from Taiwan and other countries around the world to share best practices and current developments in the battle against COVID-19. Topics of discussion will include:

  • shelter health and safety guidelines,
  • response principles and control measures,
  • experiences from other epidemic situations,
  • use of technology,
  • how to help shelter staff work from home,
  • strategies to deal with city, state or national lockdowns,
  • protecting client confidentiality,
  • advice for other GBV prevention programs

Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong have been praised for their efforts to curtail the spread of coronavirus. Some have attributed this success to lessons learned from the SARS outbreak in 2003. While the current crisis is far from over, there may be experiences from Asia that could be of benefit to other parts of the world.

The goals of this webinar will be to share information on disease control policies of shelter organizations, provide support and solidarity to front-line staff already working in difficult circumstances, and highlight areas of concern that may have been overlooked by policymakers.

Registration is free. The webinar will be recorded and the video posted online so people who were not able to join can view it later.

Contributing organizations:

  • Mustard Seed Mission (MSM), Taiwan
  • The Garden of Hope Foundation (GOH), Taiwan
  • Global Network of Women’s Shelters
  • Asian Network of Women’s Shelters
  • Other shelter organizations from around the world

Agenda:

  • Introductions and housekeeping (5 minutes)
  • Presentation by MSM (15 minutes)
  • Presentation from GOH (5 minutes)
  • Updates from the regions – Asia, Europe, Africa, MENA, Latin America, N America (3-5 minutes each)
  • Q&A / Discussion (35-45 minutes)

Documents:

Many thanks to the US National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) for hosting this event.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

Asian Network of Women’s Shelters Internship Program

GOH shelter in KaohsiungThe Asian Network of Women’s Shelters (ANWSInternship Program is a unique two-week project that offers talented professionals, who are working for crisis shelters or other organizations offering services to survivors of gender-based violence in Asia, the opportunity to gain a hands-on experience of shelter management in Taiwan. The program runs in November 2019 to give interns the opportunity to take part in the Fourth World Conference of Women’s Shelters (4WCWS).

Application Deadline: August 31, 2019

Program Dates*: Two weeks in November 2019 (exact dates to be decided by the interns and hosting shelters).

Suggested Itinerary*:

  • Nov 4: Arrive in Taiwan / Briefing
  • Nov 5-8: Participate in 4WCWS
  • Nov 9-10: Rest
  • Nov 11-15: Internship at shelter
  • Nov 16: Return home

Applicant Criteria:

  • Gender: Female
  • Experienced social workers, counselors, supervisors and other staff at NGOs providing protection services for women and girls in Asia.
  • Outstanding applicants from other fields will also be will also be considered
  • Recommendation from an ANWS member organization
  • Proficiency in spoken English (some understanding of Chinese would be a plus)
  • Commitment to apply, develop and implement learnings in home country after the conclusion of the internship
  • Demonstrated professional excellence
  • Independent and self-directed

The ANWS secretariat, the Garden of Hope Foundation (GOH), will help interns obtain visas and make other travel and lodging arrangements.

Costs Covered by GOH:

  1. round-trip economy class airfare,
  2. all accommodation in Taiwan (shared, twin-room, mid-range hotel),
  3. registration fees for 4WCWS,
  4. visa fees (if necessary),
  5. some meals.

Interns will be expected to pay for meals while not working at the shelter or attending 4WCWS events. Commuting and airport shuttle travel is also not covered by the program. GOH will not pay the interns wages, overtime, compensation, insurance or other benefits.

Expectations and Goals 

The purpose of the program is for interns to learn through work. Interns will not be expected to take on major responsibilities, and will receive supervision and support from the host shelter, including assistance from an English-speaking member of staff who will help translate for the intern.

Interns will follow the working hours and practices of their host shelter. Interns will make presentation at a debriefing before returning home, and submit a final report on their experiences before December 1, 2019.

Click here to fill out the application form

*Program Schedule is subject to change.

Contact: King Tsang
Email: goh1690@goh.org.tw

ANWS webinar on “Guidelines for Producing Data on Shelter Needs and Violence against Women”

22417496829_20cd72441d_oIn-house collection of data on shelter needs and the prevalence and incidence of violence against women is the starting point for improving services, lobbying for better funding, and ultimately developing more effective mechanisms at the policy level to eradicate violence against women.

This webinar on September 27, 2018 at 21:30 on Thursday evening (Taipei time) will introduce the Canadian shelter network’s rationale for shared measurement practices, and highlight some of the more practical concerns of aggregating data across a diverse network. The webinar is organized by the Asian Network of Women’s Shelters (ANWS) and hosted by Alberta Council of Women’s Shelters (ACWS).

The webinar will be led by Jan Reimer, executive director of ACWS, and Cat Van Wielingen, research and projects advisor with ACWS (bios below).

ACWS is a peak body for women’s shelters in the Canadian province of Alberta, providing support to members and leadership to leverage collective knowledge, and inform solutions to end domestic violence. ACWS has decades of experience collecting data and conducting research on local, national and global levels to develop tools for shelters to use in public information campaigns and advocacy for policy change.

Please register for the webinar here. After signing up, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about how to join the webinar.

  • Webinar topic: “Guidelines for Producing Data on Shelter Needs and Violence against Women”
  • Date and time: September 27, 2018, 9:30PM Taipei Time.
  • Agenda:
    21:30 Introductions and review of webinar protocols
    21:35 Presentation by Jan and Cat
    22:20 Q&A
    22:50 Closing remarks
    23:00 Webinar ends

About the speakers:

janJan Reimer
Throughout her long and distinguished career, Jan Reimer has worked tirelessly to promote safe communities and ensure the well-being of society’s most vulnerable members – seniors, youth and women in abusive relationships. Since 2002, she has served as the Executive Director of ACWS, which supports 37women’s shelters across the province. Ms. Reimer has helped propel the organization into a leadership role on issues of domestic violence in Alberta and enhanced awareness and support for ACWS. She was instrumental in the creation of the World Conference of Women’s Shelters, with the first conference held in Edmonton in 2008.  She has served as a founding member of the Global Network of Women’s Shelters and Women’s Shelters Canada. Prior to ACWS, she worked as a consultant, developing, among other things, the Senior FriendlyTM Program, which was implemented across Canada.

An alderman for nine years, Ms. Reimer went on to serve as Mayor of the City of Edmonton from 1989 to 1995. During her two terms in office, she undertook a number of strategic initiatives, including: the Mayor’s Task Force on Safer Cities, a Youth Advisory Committee, a diversity initiative, an economic development strategy, a world renowned approach to waste management, the Mayor’s Task Force on Investment in the Arts and equitable hiring practices. Jan is the recipient of the 2006 Governor General’s Award in Commemoration of the Persons Case, was named an “Edmontonian of the Century” and recently had a school named after her in the City of Edmonton.

Cat Van Wielingen
A Research and Projects Advisor with ACWS since 2014, Cat Van Wielingen has supported the council and its members to build and sustain their capacity to conduct action-based research. In this role, she works closely with the ACWS membership on training, support and strategic planning for the network’s shared database, data collection and outcome measurement practices.

Cat believes in collaboration and, in her time at ACWS, is fortunate to have witnessed first hand the strides shelters can make when they work collectively to end violence against women.

Prior to joining ACWS, Cat worked as the Quality Assurance Coordinator for a domestic violence organization in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. She graduated from the University of Victoria in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Applied Ethics and obtained her Master’s degree in Planning at the University of Calgary in 2015.

Links

Reference documents